Architecture_Metaphor

What is the relevance of metaphors in and for knowledge production within the fields of architecture and urbanism? How do they affect both design practices as well as theoretical discourses? Which metaphors are of particular importance in this respect? What is the function of architectural metaphors in scientific argumentations or in the construction of institutional identities? How, and for what purpose are metaphors deployed in different disciplines, such as philosophy, law, political theory, information sciences, or the natural sciences? Have architectural metaphors changed over time and in conjunction with developments in architecture? What images of architecture are being created in disciplines that heavily draw on architectural metaphors, and are they affecting architectural thinking, designing and making in return?

We welcome proposals from all disciplines, including but not limited to architectural history and theory, art history, cultural and media studies, history, sociology, and design theory. We strongly encourage applications from areas in which architectural metaphors feature prominently, e.g., science and technology studies, ethnology, medicine, biology, or computer and information sciences. We also welcome submissions from non-academic practitioners and thus perspectives on experienced-based knowledge, presented, e.g., in the form of work reports or reflections on common practice.

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Architecture_Metaphor
The House of the Body. An allegorical design comparing the organs of the body to the divisions of a house. From Cohn's Ma'aseh Toviyyah, 1707. Heb 7459.800*, Houghton Library, Harvard University, Public Domain.